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Hull and East Riding students enjoy a taste of life in the NHS

Hull and East Riding students are taking a hands-on approach as they get the chance to experience an assortment of NHS roles in the fifth annual ‘A Day in the Life of the NHS’ event at Hull Royal Infirmary, part of Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, on Monday 18 November.

This event offers local students the opportunity to navigate six different scenarios, each showing how the roles within the NHS work together for the health and wellbeing of patients and how vital each role is.

The interactive learning event, brought together by health and education organisations from across Hull and East Yorkshire, will open with an address from Commonwealth boxing champion, and local wellness advocate, Tommy Coyle.

Deborah Lowe, lead for nursing and quality improvement at NHS Hull Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “There is a huge and diverse range of roles within the NHS and engaging with children at a young age around these career options is a fantastic way to encourage them into a potential career in health across Hull and the East Riding.

Following the success of previous years, the event is back again with students from seven different schools from across Hull and the East Riding signed up to take part. Each of the scenarios on offer will be brought to the students by real-life health staff, with each session giving the students the chance to learn about the different roles and advice on how to pursue an NHS career.

Debbie continued: “At this event, the students will not only learn about the roles of doctors and nurses, but also surgeons, occupational therapists and falls specialists.

“The unique, interactive nature of the A Day in the Life event hopes to inspire these young people to realise how rewarding a career in the NHS could be.”

One of the most popular scenarios is back again, seeing the students introduced to the operating theatre where they can try their hand at a life size game of operation. Students will also have an opportunity to learn and practice basic life support.

The University of Hull will be providing information on a range of healthcare careers at the event.

Professor Julie Jomeen, dean of the faculty of health sciences at the University of Hull, said: “Many of the nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, paramedics, doctors and operating department practitioners of the future that will work in our region’s hospitals will study here at the University of Hull, so we are delighted to play a part in raising awareness of all healthcare professions to pupils attending this special event.”

“Our lecturers and Operating Department Practice students will be giving pupils the opportunity to handle surgical equipment and simulate the experience of gowning and gloving for surgical procedures so they can see and feel what it is like for an operating department practitioner working in the operating theatre. They’ll be helping and encouraging them to understand and explore different job roles within healthcare and highlighting how they can lead to a fulfilling career with excellent employment prospects.”

Paula South, Director of Quality and Integrated Governance/ Executive Nurse for NHS East Riding Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “A Day in the Life of the NHS’ is designed first and foremost to showcase the wide variety of NHS careers available and to help young people make the right academic choices based on the careers which are of interest to them.

“Staffing shortages continue to be an issue both regionally and nationally for the NHS which is being addressed in many ways.  A day in the life offers local health organisations the opportunity to work collectively to showcase the range of roles available and hopefully inspire the next generation of NHS professionals.”

Event Speaker, Tommy Coyle added: “A day in the life of the NHS is a great day for young, aspiring students to get an insight into what a potential career in the NHS may look like.

“Many people have to experience two or three jobs until they find their passion and purpose and this initiative helps to eliminate some uncertainties and give them the information they need to pursue an NHS career.

“A job in the NHS is more than just a job, there’s much more reward when you’re changing and potentially saving lives.”

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